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Happy New Year-some trivia

31 Dec

Happy New Year everyone!!

 

A little New Year Trivia…..

 

Baby New Year Tradition

Tradition of using a baby to signify the New Year was started by ancient Greeks around 600 B.C. They would carry a baby around in a basket to honor Dionysus, the God of Fertility and symbolize his annual rebirth.


Burning "Mr. Old Year"

In Colombia, Cuba and Puerto Rico families stuff a life-size male doll with things that have bad memories or sadness associated with them, and then they dress it up in old clothes from each family member. At the stroke of midnight, this ‘Mr. Old Year’ is set on fire.


Eating 12 Grapes

In Spain people eat 12 grapes as the clock strikes midnight (one each time the clock chimes) on New Year’s Eve. This peculiar ritual originated in the twentieth century when freak weather conditions resulted in an unseasonable bumper harvest of grapes. Not able to decide what to do about so many grapes at Christmas time, the King of Spain and the grape growers came up with the idea of the New Year ritual.


Eating Noodles

Late on the evening of December 3 1, people of Japan would eat a bowl of buckwheat noodles called "toshikoshi soba" ("year-crossing noodles") and listen for the sound of the Buddhist temple bells, which were rung 108 times at midnight. The sound of these bells is said to purify the listeners of the 108 sins or evil passions that plague every human being.


White Clothes

In Brazil most people wear white clothes on New Year’s Eve to bring good luck and peace for the year that will follow.


Gifts in Shoes

In Greece children leave their shoes by the fireside on New Year’s Day (also the Festival of Saint Basil in Greece) with the hope that Saint Basil, who was famous for his kindness, will come and fill their shoes with gifts.


Carry a Suitcase

In Venezuela, Argentina, Bolivia, and Mexico, those with hopes of traveling in the New Year carry a suitcase around the house at midnight. Some even carry it around the block to ensure traveling at greater distances.


Burn Crackers

The people in China believe that there are evil spirits that roam the earth. So on New Year they burn crackers to scare the evil spirits. The doors and windows of every home in china can be seen sealed with paper. This is to keep the evil demons out.

 

Barrels of Tar

In Scotland, the New Year is called Hogmanay. In the villages of Scotland, barrels of tar are set afire and then rolled down the streets. This ritual symbolizes that the old year is burned up and the new one is allowed to enter.

 

Rosh Hashanah

The Jewish New Year is called Rosh Hashanah. It is a holy time when Jews recall the things they have done wrong in the past, and then promise to do better in the future. Special services are held in the synagogues, children are given new clothes and New Year loaves are baked to remind people of harvest time.

 

Beginning of Spring

Iran’s New Year’s Day, which is in March, celebrates not only the beginning of the new year according to the solar calendar, but also bahar, "the beginning of spring."

 

 

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4 Comments

Posted by on December 31, 2008 in Uncategorized

 

4 responses to “Happy New Year-some trivia

  1. Julie

    December 31, 2008 at 2:54 pm

    wow……nice informations on new year…………thanks……….best wishes for a happy and prosperous new year.

     
  2. Parthasarathi

    December 31, 2008 at 6:21 pm

    Thanks a tonne,Julie.Pl accept my best wishes for a bright and joyful new year to you and your family

     
  3. Ayesha

    January 1, 2009 at 2:47 pm

    A really nice one. In particular, I like the idea of carrying a baby in a basket and that of staying awake to hear the temple bells ring at mid-night to usher in the new year. The baby symbolizes innocence and the temple bells stand for getting re-connected with divinity. Thank you dear KP. May the New Year bring a deeper sense of joy and fulfillment for you.

     
  4. Parthasarathi

    January 1, 2009 at 5:39 pm

    Thanks,Ayesha,I reciprocate the warm sentiments and wish you a happy new year, KP

     

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